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News Business Advice

  Business Advice

Covid Restriction Support Scheme

As many businesses begin reopening their doors this week, the Revenue have confirmed those eligible for the Covid Restriction Support Scheme should be able to avail of two weeks double payment of the scheme in order to assist with restarting their businesses. See details of the Revenue press release here. As Revenue have reiterated in recent times, all reliefs such as the CRSS require up to date tax clearance certificates which mean the taxpayer must have all tax returns filed and payments made or debt arrangements agreed. At Roberts Nathan we continue to assist our clients both applying for and maintaining Covid reliefs. Feel free to contact us if you wish to discuss any Covid supports or any issues arising for your business as the economy reopens over the coming weeks.
May 12, 2021
  Business Advice

RN Podcast: 2021 – What is in store for the Irish tax landscape in the year ahead

Vivian Nathan, Managing Partner, welcomes Brendan Murphy, Tax Partner, to Roberts Nathan. Brendan joined the firm at the beginning of 2021 to continue the firms expansion and our commitment to providing our clients with dedicated specialist within specific sectors. On this podcast, Viv and Brendan discuss the opportunities Brendan sees for businesses from a tax perspective in the year ahead and what will be the key areas of focus for tax advisors. They also look at the impact to date of Brexit and how this will continue to effect trading between Ireland and the UK. Finally they will look at the cost Covid-19 is having on the Irish economy and what the future Irish tax landscape may look like.
We hope you enjoy listening to our podcast and if you have any questions regarding any of the points raised please let us know.
 
April 19, 2021
  Business Advice

UK Businesses – Do you have the correct Irish VAT number?

Check your VAT number VIES VAT number validation
No, invalid VAT number for cross border transactions within the EU
Since June 2019, companies registering for VAT have had to specify whether they wish for a “domestic only” or “intra-EU” VAT registration. The domestic only registration has helped speed up registration process for business seeking to register for VAT however, we have seen a number of instances where businesses are unaware of the need to include an intra-EU registration within their application. In particular we have noted many UK businesses applying for Irish VAT numbers on the basis of being a non-resident company with operations in Ireland and obtaining an IE VAT reg.  If the company is importing goods into Ireland for domestic only supply, then the domestic VAT registration is sufficient and they are charged Irish VAT at the point of importation of the goods into the EU.  Thus the domestic VAT registration applies only if the company is importing goods into Ireland, storing and distributing them here and not further distributing outside of Ireland. However if your company is looking to use Ireland as a new trading base in dealing with EU customers this will not be an effective VAT number for EU wide trading. So check your VAT number.  If you get the above message on the VIES system then it is only a domestic VAT registration. This will cause issues if you are bringing goods into Ireland and then intending to export them to another EU country as you will need to apply for an intra-EU VAT number.  It will be the exact same number but will need to be validated as otherwise your customers will get the above notice when the VAT number is checked for EU trading.  This causes an issue for your EU customers as you will not have issued a valid VAT invoice. We have helped a number of clients with this by amending their VAT registration and getting the option for intra-EU VAT registration. This requires additional information for Revenue which we can assist with. If you would like to explore further options around your business, please contact Brendan Murphy who would be very pleased to assist you. Brendan Murphy:
brendan.murphy@robertsnathan.com
March 31, 2021
  Business Advice

Revenue Update – Debt warehousing and Covid-19 supports

Last week Revenue began to write to taxpayers who are availing of debt warehousing and other Covid-19 supports. In relation to debt warehousing, Revenue are reiterating the need for all returns to be filed on time, even where warehousing is being availed of on payment. Any taxpayer availing of debt warehousing but does not have all tax filings up to date will be reminded to do so immediately or lose their entitlement to avail of the Debt Warehousing Scheme. Any returns outstanding will be brought to the taxpayers attention in the Revenue latest correspondence. For taxpayers availing of both Debt Warehousing and either the Employment Wage Subsidy Scheme or the Covid-19 Restrictions Support Scheme, they will be advised to bring any outstanding returns up to date within 21 days or their tax clearance will be rescinded and they will no longer be eligible for any of the support schemes. Revenue have also began a second stage of TWSS reconciliation, seeing employers who have availed of the scheme receiving a detailed reconciliation through ROS. Employers have until the end of June 2021 to review the information contained in the reconciliation by Revenue and accept, appeal or make any required adjustments to their claim by this date. It is also worth noting for taxpayers who are not availing of debt warehousing but do have tax liabilities outstanding that Revenue will seek to enforce debt collection of outstanding liabilities over the coming weeks as highlighted in a press release earlier this month. Finally, late filing surcharges for corporation tax returns had been suspended from March 2020, however Revenue have now confirmed that for corporation tax returns due between 23 March 2020 and 23 June 2021 (i.e. accounting periods ended between 30 June 2019 and 30 September 2020), will need to be filed by 30 June 2021. Corporation tax returns (including iXBRL financial statements if required) will be required to be filed on time from this period on to avoid late surcharges. If you would like to explore further options around your business, please contact Brendan Murphy who would be very pleased to assist you. Brendan Murphy: brendan.murphy@robertsnathan.com
March 30, 2021
  Brexit

Is Brexit Having a Damaging Impact on your Profit Margin? – Solutions Considered

As an Irish based accountancy and business advisory firm, Roberts Nathan assists frustrated UK and Irish business owners who are confused, worried, and uncertain where to turn to in a bid to maintain their turnover and profitability following Brexit.   Main Challenges of Brexit Companies in the UK have been approaching us to help them find a way forward when they experience one or all of the following challenges:
  • Extra Brexit-related charges for exporting into the EU means your profit margins are eroded and now it’s far less viable to continue to trade in the EU.
  • Your customers in Europe are being asked by couriers to pay VAT upfront on the goods being shipped to them, resulting in those customers becoming disgruntled and ultimately sourcing the same product elsewhere.
  • Delays at ports which means your customers are not getting their goods on time when needed.
  • More forms and paperwork resulting in more admin and headaches. Many businesses had to hire more staff to handle the extra admin - meaning more costs.
  Options Available to Overcome the Challenges Faced with the above challenges, our UK clients are left with only three options:   1. Continue to export goods to the EU as before Brexit Bite the bullet and pay the VAT and other charges yourself - instead of your customer paying these. For many, this isn't financially viable as profit margins will be eroded significantly.   Or   2. Stop exporting to the EU altogether The majority of clients have told us that without ongoing access to the EU markets, as has been the case for many decades, their businesses will be compromised and face the risk of closure.   Or   3. There is a final option - a solution which we recommend to many of our UK clients. We can set up and register your business here in Ireland through a subsidiary company, wholly owned by its UK parent. In circumstances where products are imported from outside the EU, goods can be shipped from Ireland to your EU customers, helping you to avoid various Brexit related charges. Your customers will receive their goods on time. We can assist you in dealing with the VAT matters arising in Ireland. This solution will allow you to keep running your business at the required profit margin you need while avoiding the Brexit challenges faced above.   If you would like to explore this valuable solution further, please contact Peter Roberts or Tomas O’Leary, who would be very pleased to assist you in considering this worthwhile option.   Please contact:   Peter Roberts:
peter.roberts@robertsnathan.com Tel: +353214217940 Or Tomas O’Leary: tomas.oleary@robertsnathan.com Tel: +353214217940
February 2, 2021
  Business

Do you help international companies enter new markets?

Join Aidan Scollard, Partner at Roberts Nathan, who in conjunction with Soft Land Partners will be speaking to professionals who help international companies enter new markets at this free online event taking place on Thursday 4th February from 4-5pm. Register your attendance by clicking here.
February 1, 2021
  Business Advice

Are you a UK Based Director of an Irish Registered Company?

The (European Union) EU and the United Kingdom (UK) finally reached agreement on a Free Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), avoiding a hard Brexit.  However, this does not change the fact that the UK has left the EU and therefore is no longer part of the EU single market and customs union and is now regarded as a third country.  This creates a very real issue for a number of companies and their Directors in the UK and Ireland.

In this article, Roberts Nathan Partner Aidan Scollard reviews the potential significant changes for UK resident Directors of Irish registered companies as the UK now becomes a third country.  Although there are more than 60,000 Irish Directorships of UK registered companies there are also a significant number of UK based directors of Irish companies for which Brexit now creates significant changes.

EEA Resident Director Requirement

Companies Registration Office have previously alerted service providers to the fact that under Irish company law an Irish registered company must have at least one European Economic Area (EEA) resident Director on the board on an ongoing basis or a bond in place to cover filing liabilities.

Many Directors based in the UK who are either of Irish decent or UK based companies who have established Irish entities as part of their Brexit planning will need to consider this likely change.

Where an existing Irish company has fulfilled this Director requirement by appointing a UK resident director they should now consider replacing that director or adding an additional director who is an EEA-resident.

It should be noted that this requirement is based on residency, not nationality. Thus for example, a company director of Irish nationality who lives in the UK and has done so for a number of years is unlikely to satisfy the EEA requirement in the future which is a question a number of our clients have been considering.

S137 Bond

It is possible for a company to put in place a Section 137 Revenue Bond which is an insurance policy that CRO approve in replacement of having an EEA resident individual on the board. This insurance policy covers against fines or penalties incurred to the value of €25,000 for non-compliance and covers the company for a period of two years at which point the company will either need to renew the bond or appoint a director who meets the requirement.

The bonds are relatively easy to put in place but will have a premium cost to maintain for the two year period and we have put these in place for a number of clients recently.

The Exception to the Rule – ‘Real and Continuous link’

It is possible for the Directors of an Irish Company who have no EEA-resident directors to apply to the Revenue Commissioners for a Statement under Section 140 of the Companies Act 2014 which, if granted, will relieve the company from the requirement to hold a Bond or to have an EEA-resident director.

This Statement is granted based on the company having a ‘real and continuous link to the State of Ireland’. The successful company will need to satisfy one or more of the following two conditions:

  1. The affairs of the company are managed by one or more persons from a place of business established in the State and that person or those persons is or are authorised by the company to act on its behalf.
  2. The company carries on a trade in the State.

Furthermore, a company may be granted this Statement based on either of the following two conditions:

  1. The company is a subsidiary or a holding company of a company or other body corporate that satisfies either or both of the conditions specified in 1 and 2.
  2. The company is a subsidiary of a company, another subsidiary of which satisfies either or both of the conditions specified in 1 and 2.

This Statement is granted based on retrospective activity and will generally not be granted to a company that intends to have a real and continuous link to the state.

Once the Statement is made by Revenue to the successful company, the Company Secretary can apply to the Registrar of Companies for a certificate that exempts the company from the Section 137 bond requirement or the need to have an EEA-resident director appointed to the board.

Application for this exemption to Companies registration office must be accompanied by this statement from the Revenue Commissioners made within two months of the date of the application of the Revenue Commissioners statement.

This is the common basis that we see UK parent company clients using for their Irish operating subsidiaries and we have helped a number of clients in this area where they can clearly prove that there is a real and continuous activity here in the Irish state.

Final Word

Company Directors need to consider the implications since the UK has left the EU and consider their options. As with any legal or accounting issue early advice is important.

Contact us if you wish to discuss the impacts of any of these changes to your company structures here in Ireland and any structure planning requirements or to obtain a bond.

January 21, 2021